Planning the Perfect Friendsgiving

Let me start by saying that Friendsgiving is an incredible way to celebrate Thanksgiving when you’re far from your family. It’s this time of year when those without family around feel the most alone, so it’s perfectly fitting to celebrate with your chosen family of friends.

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Right. So. I’ve never put together a Friendsgiving. I’ve attended several and baked for all but never actually hosted one.

Phew. That was weighing on me.

How then am I writing this post? Well, consider this a guest post if you will, as my dearest friend, Becks, put her experience and effort to paper and contributed the below points to make sure your Friendsgiving is perfection! Becks has hosted many a Friendsgiving as well as epic Shabbat dinners that’ll make any restaurant envious. Check out her IG riiiiiiiight here.

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1. Don’t do it alone.

It’s called Friendsgiving for a reason. Enlist your friends to come over the day before or day of and help you. Or better yet, make it a potluck! If you make the main and a side or two, you can easily delegate other sides and desserts to your friends. They’ll be happy they can bring something, and you’ll be happy you’re not stuck with all the cooking!

2. Get creative and stray from the traditional recipes.

Everyone will be expecting the usual turkey and potatoes, but they’ll thank you for giving their tastebuds a novel experience. I always do a twist on turkey and make a slow cooker recipe with turkey breast, sage, and white wine. 

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3. Choose two reliable friends in advance to help be your cleanup crew.

The last thing you want is to get stuck with all of the dishes after everyone has gone home. You can also use eco friendly disposable plates and utensils which will make cleanup a breeze. 

4. If everyone in your crew knows each other, conversation will flow.

But if you have a few people who are new to the group, think of some table topics to start interesting conversations so everyone can get to know each other. 

5. Plan two hours of buffer time.

This will allow for last minute runs to the grocery store for that forgotten ingredient, as well as time for you to decompress with a glass of wine after a long day of cooking.


My favorite part about fall is without a doubt pie season. I love baking my grandfather’s apple pie! That and the colder temps bring out the soup and coffee fiend in me. Who am I kidding? I’m a coffee fiend 365 days a year.

You can find the recipe for the apple pie and my banana nut loaf here. Enjoy!